Precautions to Save yourself from Coronavirus | WHO Recommended

With Coronavirus picking up pace across the world. With Globally 6065 confirmed cases. In China 5997 confirmed, 9239 suspected, 1239 severe & 132 deaths. The Virus may turn into a Global Pandemic if not stopped at the Right Time.

With India coming under the High-Risk Category as India shares a border with China as well as has huge trade with China, chances of the Coronavirus reaching India is very High!

We need to prepare for the worse & hence Febbrisia recommends you to follow the advisories given by the Recognized Medical Organizations such as WHO & the Government and not fall prey to fake WhatsApp Broadcasts.

WHO’s standard recommendations for the general public to reduce exposure to and transmission of a range of illnesses are as follows, which include hand and respiratory hygiene, and safe food practices:

  • Frequently clean hands by using alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water;
  • When coughing and sneezing cover mouth and nose with flexed elbow or tissue – throw the tissue away immediately and wash hands;
  • Avoid close contact with anyone who has a fever and cough;
  • If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing seek medical care early and share previous travel history with your health care provider;
  • When visiting live markets in areas currently experiencing cases of a novel coronavirus, avoid direct unprotected contact with live animals and surfaces in contact with animals;
  • The consumption of raw or undercooked animal products should be avoided. Raw meat, milk or animal organs should be handled with care, to avoid cross-contamination with uncooked foods, as per good food safety practices.

To get live Situation Reports from WHO, Visit
https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/situation-reports

What is Christmas Disease?

Christmas is about to begin soon, meanwhile being a site that cares for your health we thought to make you well informed about a disease called “Christmas Disease”

It has No Relation with the fest, but why not understand it!

What Is Christmas Disease?

Christmas disease, also called hemophilia B or factor IX hemophilia, is a rare genetic disorder in which your blood doesn’t clot properly. If you have Christmas disease, your body produces little or no factor IX. This leads to prolonged or spontaneous bleeding. The less factor IX your body produces, the worse your symptoms are. Without treatment, Christmas disease can be fatal.

A person is born with Christmas disease, but it may not be diagnosed until later in life. It’s estimated that two-thirds of cases are inherited. The other cases are caused by spontaneous gene mutations that occur for unknown reasons during fetal development. The disease almost exclusively in males.

The disease is named for Stephen Christmas, who was the first person diagnosed with the condition in 1952.

How Is Christmas Disease Inherited?

The gene responsible for Christmas disease is carried on the X chromosome. Females have two X chromosomes and males have one X and one Y chromosome. If a male inherits the faulty gene on his X chromosome, he could develop Christmas disease. If a female inherits the faulty gene on one of her X chromosomes, she’ll be a carrier for Christmas disease and may pass the defective gene on to her children.

All daughters of a father who has the defective gene will be Christmas disease carriers. A father doesn’t pass the faulty gene on to his sons. A mother who carries the faulty gene has a 50 percent chance of having a son with Christmas disease and a 50 percent chance of having a daughter who’s a carrier of the disease.

Females are usually only carriers because they have two X chromosomes. If they inherit the faulty gene on one X chromosome, the other X chromosome produces sufficient factor IX for blood clotting. However, female carriers may produce less factor IX than women who aren’t carriers, which can result in mild abnormal bleeding after injuries or surgical procedures. A female can inherit Christmas disease if both of her parents pass the faulty gene on to her, although it’s rare for a female to have two parents with the faulty gene.

Genetic Testing for Christmas Disease

If you’re a woman with a family history of Christmas disease, you can have genetic testing to see if you carry the faulty gene. Genetic testing is a very accurate way to detect the faulty gene.

What Are the Symptoms of Christmas Disease?

Severe cases of Christmas disease are usually diagnosed in babies younger than 1 year old. Mild cases may not be diagnosed until a child reaches their toddler years or sometimes even later. In all cases, diagnosis usually happens after abnormal bleeding from an injury or surgery.

Events that may lead your doctor to suspect Christmas disease include:

  • prolonged bleeding, such as can occur during circumcision, after surgical procedures or tooth extractions, or from cuts or other wounds
  • unexplained, excessive bruising or prolonged nosebleeds
  • unexplained blood in the urine or feces caused by internal bleeding in the gastrointestinal or urinary tract
  • internal bleeding that pools in the joints, which causes pain and swelling

Severe cases of Christmas disease may cause unexplained bleeding in the skull after childbirth and spontaneous bleeding.

Diagnosing Christmas Disease

If you or your child shows symptoms of Christmas disease, your doctor may order blood tests to confirm the diagnosis, including:

  • a factor IX test to determine how much of the clotting factor is present in your blood
  • an activated partial thromboplastin time test to detect how fast your blood clots
  • a prothrombin time test, which is another test to detect how quickly your blood clots
  • a fibrinogen test to determine your body’s ability to form a clot

How Is Christmas Disease Treated?

There’s no cure for Christmas disease, but there are treatments for the condition. Regular treatment is essential for managing the symptoms of Christmas disease.

Factor IX Injections

Christmas disease can be treated with factor IX injections to prevent or stop bleeding. The factor IX can be derived from donated human blood or made in a laboratory. Artificial factor IX is called recombinant factor IX and is generally recommended over the blood-derived factor because it’s safer. Blood-derived factor IX may contain dangerous pathogens, such as hepatitis or HIV. However, the risks of contracting HIV and hepatitis from factor IX treatment is lower than ever due to improved blood-screening practices.

Wound Treatment

If you have a mild form of Christmas disease, your doctor may give you a product called desmopressin acetate to apply to small wounds to stop the bleeding. Larger wounds and internal bleeding require medical treatment from your doctor.

Preventive Treatment

If you have a severe form of Christmas disease, you may need preventive blood transfusions to avoid or reduce prolonged and heavy bleeding, which is known as prophylaxis. These are especially important in children. If you receive blood-derived factor or blood transfusions, you should be vaccinated for hepatitis B.

Complications

There’s a slight chance that you could die from excessive blood loss, experience bleeding in the brain, or have long-term joint problems from internal bleeding. In rare cases, the treatment for Christmas disease may result in an abnormal thrombosis or clot formation.

Further complications of Christmas disease may be prevented through annual checkups as and regular blood testing for infections. You should also avoid aspirin and other medications that can interfere with blood platelet function.

Outlook

With treatment, most people with Christmas disease are likely to lead normal lives. Since there’s no cure for the disease, it’s important to make sure you avoid situations in which excess bleeding could occur. You also can receive blood-clotting therapy before any surgery or after any injury.

Living with Christmas disease can be stressful for those who have it and their families, especially when accidents or injuries that could lead to excessive bleeding occur. Talk to your doctor about ways you can prevent bleeding and ask for tips about how to manage your condition if an injury occurs.

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Chickenpox | Know about this Winter Disease!

In the month of December, it’s not just festive cheer that’s in the air – there are several airborne diseases that are active during this time of the year till the beginning of Spring. One of the most contagious diseases in the world, chickenpox, is one such disease. The child will have bumps/ blisters that are itchy and contagious, rashes.

Chickenpox is an infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus. It causes an itchy rash with small, fluid-filled blisters. Chickenpox is highly contagious to people who haven’t had the disease or been vaccinated against it. Today, a vaccine is available that protects children against chickenpox. Routine vaccination is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The chickenpox vaccine is a safe, effective way to prevent chickenpox and its possible complications.

Symptoms

The itchy blister rash caused by chickenpox infection appears 10 to 21 days after exposure to the virus and usually lasts about five to 10 days. Other signs and symptoms, which may appear one to two days before the rash, include:

  • Fever
  • Loss of appetite
  • Headache
  • Tiredness and a general feeling of being unwell (malaise)

Once the chickenpox rash appears, it goes through three phases:

  • Raised pink or red bumps (papules), which break out over several days
  • Small fluid-filled blisters (vesicles), which form in about one day and then break and leak
  • Crusts and scabs, which cover the broken blisters and take several more days to heal

New bumps continue to appear for several days, so you may have all three stages of the rash — bumps, blisters and scabbed lesions — at the same time. You can spread the virus to other people for up to 48 hours before the rash appears, and the virus remains contagious until all broken blisters have crusted over.

The disease is generally mild in healthy children. In severe cases, the rash can cover the entire body, and lesions may form in the throat, eyes, and mucous membranes of the urethra, anus and vagina.

When to see a doctor

If you think you or your child might have chickenpox, consult your doctor. He or she usually can diagnose chickenpox by examining the rash and considering other symptoms. Your doctor can also prescribe medications to lessen the severity of chickenpox and treat complications, if necessary. To avoid infecting others in the waiting room, call ahead for an appointment and mention that you think you or your child may have chickenpox.

Also, let your doctor know if:

  • The rash spreads to one or both eyes.
  • The rash gets very red, warm or tender. This could indicate a secondary bacterial skin infection.
  • The rash is accompanied by dizziness, disorientation, rapid heartbeat, shortness of breath, tremors, loss of muscle coordination, worsening cough, vomiting, stiff neck or a fever higher than 102 F (38.9 C).
  • Anyone in the household has a problem with his or her immune system or is younger than 6 months.

Causes

Chickenpox infection is caused by a virus. It can spread through direct contact with the rash. It can also spread when a person with the chickenpox coughs or sneezes and you inhale the air droplets.

Risk factors

Your risk of becoming infected with the varicella-zoster virus that causes chickenpox is higher if you haven’t already had chickenpox or if you haven’t had the chickenpox vaccine. It’s especially important for people who work in child care or school settings to be vaccinated.

Most people who have had chickenpox or have been vaccinated against chickenpox are immune to chickenpox. If you’ve been vaccinated and still get chickenpox, symptoms are often milder, with fewer blisters and mild or no fever. A few people can get chickenpox more than once, but this is rare.

Complications

Chickenpox is normally a mild disease. But it can be serious and can lead to complications including:

  • Bacterial infections of the skin, soft tissues, bones, joints or bloodstream (sepsis)
  • Dehydration
  • Pneumonia
  • Inflammation of the brain (encephalitis)
  • Toxic shock syndrome
  • Reye’s syndrome in children and teenagers who take aspirin during chickenpox
  • Death

Who’s at risk?

People who are at higher risk of chickenpox complications include:

  • Newborns and infants whose mothers never had chickenpox or the vaccine
  • Adolescents and adults
  • Pregnant women who haven’t had chickenpox
  • People who smoke
  • People whose immune systems are weakened by medication, such as chemotherapy, or by a disease, such as cancer or HIV
  • People who are taking steroid medications for another disease or condition, such as asthma

Chickenpox and pregnancy

Low birth weight and limb abnormalities are more common among babies born to women who are infected with chickenpox early in their pregnancy. When a mother is infected with chickenpox in the week before birth or within a couple of days after giving birth, her baby has a higher risk of developing a serious, life-threatening infection.

If you’re pregnant and not immune to chickenpox, talk to your doctor about the risks to you and your unborn child.

Chickenpox and shingles

If you’ve had chickenpox, you’re at risk of a complication called shingles. The varicella-zoster virus remains in your nerve cells after the skin infection has healed. Many years later, the virus can reactivate and resurface as shingles — a painful cluster of short-lived blisters. The virus is more likely to reappear in older adults and people who have weakened immune systems.

The pain of shingles can persist long after the blisters disappear. This is called postherpetic neuralgia and can be severe.

Two shingles vaccines (Zostavax and Shingrix) are available for adults who have had chickenpox. Shingrix is approved and recommended for people age 50 and older, including those who’ve previously received Zostavax. Zostavax isn’t recommended until age 60. Shingrix is preferred over Zostavax.

Prevention

The chickenpox (varicella) vaccine is the best way to prevent chickenpox. Experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that the vaccine provides complete protection from the virus for nearly 98 percent of people who receive both of the recommended doses. When the vaccine doesn’t provide complete protection, it significantly lessens the severity of chickenpox.

The chickenpox vaccine (Varivax) is recommended for:

  • Young children. In the United States, children receive two doses of the varicella vaccine — the first between ages 12 and 15 months and the second between ages 4 and 6 years — as part of the routine childhood vaccination schedule.The vaccine can be combined with the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, but for some children between the ages of 12 and 23 months, the combination may increase the risk of fever and seizure from the vaccine. Discuss the pros and cons of combining the vaccines with your child’s doctor.
  • Unvaccinated older children. Children ages 7 to 12 years who haven’t been vaccinated should receive two catch-up doses of the varicella vaccine, given at least three months apart. Children age 13 or older who haven’t been vaccinated should also receive two catch-up doses of the vaccine, given at least four weeks apart.
  • Unvaccinated adults who’ve never had chickenpox and are at high risk of exposure. This includes health care workers, teachers, child care employees, international travelers, military personnel, adults who live with young children and all women of childbearing age.Adults who’ve never had chickenpox or been vaccinated usually receive two doses of the vaccine, four to eight weeks apart. If you don’t remember whether you’ve had chickenpox or the vaccine, a blood test can determine your immunity.

The chickenpox vaccine isn’t approved for:

  • Pregnant women
  • People who have weakened immune systems, such as those who are infected with HIV, or people who are taking immune-suppressing medications
  • People who are allergic to gelatin or the antibiotic neomycin

Talk to your doctor if you’re unsure about your need for the vaccine. If you’re planning on becoming pregnant, consult with your doctor to make sure you’re up to date on your vaccinations before conceiving a child.

Is it safe and effective?

Parents typically wonder whether vaccines are safe. Since the chickenpox vaccine became available, studies have consistently found it safe and effective. Side effects are generally mild and include redness, soreness, swelling and, rarely, small bumps at the site of the shot.

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How to Protect Kids from Acute Ear Infection | WinterBlogs

Winter is setting in India and it will go on to become much colder soon. Febbrisia will help you to protect yourself from Winter Diseases!

Let us discuss How to Protect Kids from Acute Ear Infection:

Symptoms: Irritation of the throat, pain in the throat, enlarged tonsils, unable to gulp food or liquids.

Causes: Eating anything cold, virus or bacteria in the air.

Precautions: Avoid feeding your child anything cold when the weather is cold. Cover their ears and neck when the wind is too strong, or before sleeping under a fan/ AC.  Feed kids more of vitamin C enriched fruits and vegetables and nuts to boost immunity. Gargle with warm water every day with a hint of salt.

Treatment: Gargle with warm water with a hint of salt. Consult a doctor.

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How to Protect Kids from Tonsil Infection | WinterBlogs

Winter is setting in India and it will go on to become much colder soon. Febbrisia will help you to protect yourself from Winter Diseases!

Let us discuss How to Protect Kids from Tonsil Infection:

Symptoms: Irritation of the throat, pain in the throat, enlarged tonsils, unable to gulp food or liquids.

Causes: Eating anything cold, virus or bacteria in the air.

Precautions: Avoid feeding your child anything cold when the weather is cold. Cover their ears and neck when the wind is too strong, or before sleeping under a fan/ AC.  Feed kids more of vitamin C enriched fruits and vegetables and nuts to boost immunity. Gargle with warm water every day with a hint of salt.

Treatment: Gargle with warm water with a hint of salt. Consult a doctor.

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How to Protect Kids from Common Cold & Fever | WinterBlogs

Winter is setting in India and it will go on to become much colder soon. Febbrisia will help you to protect yourself from Winter Diseases!

Let us discuss How to Protect Kids on Common Cold & Fever:

Symptoms: Kids start feeling weak, sniff quite a few times, complain of a headache, body ache, cough and lack of taste.

Causes: General impact on kids with low immunity due to change in weather, exposure to an infected individual’s cough.

Precautions: Avoid feeding your child anything cold, or that causes mucous such as curd or banana especially at night. Feed kids more of vitamin C enriched fruits and vegetables such as oranges, pineapples and nuts to boost immunity.

Treatment: Home-made kaadha prepared with tulsi leaves, peppercorns, grated ginger, and honey. Paracetamol, warm simple food and in severe cases, consult a doctor.

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How to Protect Kids from Stomach Flu (Viral Gastroenteritis) | WinterBlogs

Winter is setting in India and it will go on to become much colder soon. Febbrisia will help you to protect yourself from Winter Diseases!

Let us discuss How to Protect Kids from Stomach Flu (Viral Gastroenteritis):

Symptoms: A virus that impacts children, mostly under the age of two, bronchiolitis is a swelling and mucus buildup within the smallest lung air passages, according to UMMC.

The CDC and UMMC recommend washing hands frequently as the easiest way to prevent the spread of any of the illnesses. Disinfect countertops, door knobs, and other frequently touched surfaces often.

Causes: It most commonly is caused by a viral infection and is spread from person to person when coming in direct contact with nose and throat fluids of someone carrying the virus.

Precautions: Try to cover your kid’s mouth in a crowded or polluted space. Make them take steam when experience discomfort in breathing.

Treatment: Consult a doctor.

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How to Protect Kids from Bronchiolitis | WinterBlogs

Winter is setting in India and it will go on to become much colder soon. Febbrisia will help you to protect yourself from Winter Diseases!

Let us discuss How to Protect Kids from Bronchiolitis:

Symptoms: A virus that impacts children, mostly under the age of two, bronchiolitis is a swelling and mucus buildup within the smallest lung air passages, according to UMMC.

The CDC and UMMC recommend washing hands frequently as the easiest way to prevent the spread of any of the illnesses. Disinfect countertops, door knobs, and other frequently touched surfaces often.

Causes: It most commonly is caused by a viral infection and is spread from person to person when coming in direct contact with nose and throat fluids of someone carrying the virus.

Precautions: Try to cover your kid’s mouth in a crowded or polluted space. Make them take steam when experience discomfort in breathing.

Treatment: Consult a doctor.

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World COPD Day

World COPD Day is celebrated with the aim to raise awareness about the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and improve COPD care worldwide.

World COPD Day is celebrated with the aim to raise awareness about the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and improve COPD care worldwide. It is organized by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) in collaboration with health care professionals and COPD patient groups throughout the world. World COPD Day 2019 is celebrated on 20 November with the theme “The Many Faces of COPD”.

COPD is a life-threatening lung disease which results in breathing problem due to obstruction in the airways. In some cases the air sacs (alveoli) get damaged gradually leading to a condition called Emphysema.   In other cases, the airways get inflamed (irritation) leading to a condition called chronic bronchitis.


According to the World Health Organization, there are about 64 million people suffering from COPD worldwide. More than 3 million people died of COPD in 2005. As per the study, COPD will become the third leading cause of death by 2030 worldwide.

Are you at risk?

  • Exposure to tobacco smoke-active as well as passive smoking
  • Asthmatic patients who smoke are at a higher the risk of COPD
  • Exposure to outdoor and indoor Pollution such as air pollution, biofuel used for cooking and heating can lead to COPD.
  • Occupational exposure to dust and chemical-long term exposure to chemical fumes and dust irritates the lungs and can cause inflammation.
  • Family history with low levels of protein alpha-1 antitrypsin (alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency) is a disorder that runs in families increases the risk of COPD
  • Age-COPD develops gradually over the years, so symptoms appear usually at the age of 35 to 40.

   SYMPTOMS OF COPD

  • Shortness of breath (Dyspnoea)
  • Wheezing (whistling sound while breathing)
  • Chest tightness
  • Cough with mucus often called smoker’s cough
  • Unintended weight loss (in later stages)

Prevention Tips

  • Avoid smoking-Active as well as passive (second hand) smoking as it is one of the leading causes of COPD.
  • Avoid outdoor and indoor pollution such as air pollution, chemical fumes and dust.
  • Avoid moving in congested or overcrowded places such as heavy traffic, market places, and chemical factories.
  • Use of mask or any protective equipment to avoid occupational exposure of dust and chemicals.
  • Take healthy diet to reduce the risk of respiratory infections
  • Avoid exposure to fireworks, crackers, and fumes, in case you are a COPD patient.

Complications of COPD

  • Respiratory infections such as cold, flu and pneumonia
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart problems including heart attack
  • Lung cancer
  • Depression
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References: 
www.mayoclinic.org
www.nhlbi.nih.gov
www.who.int
www.webmd.com
www.goldcopd.org

A toilet is not just a toilet. It’s a life-saver!

4.2 billion people in the world living without safely managed sanitation services often face many forms of discrimination.

World Toilet Day, celebrated on 19th November every year, is about inspiring action to tackle the global sanitation crisis and help achieve Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 6, which promises sanitation for all by 2030.

Established by the World Toilet Organization in 2001, World Toilet Day was made an official UN day in 2013. UN-Water leads a task force of international agencies to campaign around a common theme.

A toilet is not just a toilet. It’s a life-saver, dignity-protector and opportunity-maker.

Whoever you are, wherever you are, sanitation is your human right. And yet, today, 4.2 billion people live without safely managed sanitation.

How can anyone lift themselves out of poverty without sanitation? We must expand access to safe toilets and leave no one behind.

Learn more about this year’s theme:

The 4.2 billion people in the world living without safely managed sanitation services often face many forms of discrimination. They can be left behind as they try to access and manage sanitation services or improve their current facilities.

Sustainable Development Goal 6 has a target to eliminate open defecation and ensure everyone has access to sustainable sanitation services by 2030, “paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations”.

World Toilet Day 2019 is drawing attention to those people being left behind without sanitation and the social, economic and environmental consequences of inaction.

A toilet is not just a toilet. It’s a life-saver, dignity-protector and opportunity-maker.

We must expand access to safe toilets and leave no one behind. Because whoever you are, wherever you are, sanitation is your human right.

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